UM-Dearborn is planning a week of events to celebrate the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

To commemorate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. UM-Dearborn, along with U-M and UM-Flint, will host programs and events dedicated to honoring the memory of this great American Icon.

Monday, January 18
  • 28TH ANNUAL UM-DEARBORN MLK DAY OF SERVICE
    All day. Register to participate.

    Volunteers from across campus and the surrounding community will come together on Monday, January 18, to lend a helping hand and inspire long lasting and positive change throughout the Metro Detroit area. Volunteers will work remotely to support Detroit-area schools and community agencies in fulfilling their valuable missions.

  • UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 2021 MLK KEYNOTE MEMORIAL LECTURE: WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?
    10:-11:30 a.m. Online. Attend the event.
    This year’s symposium features two speakers, Gloria House, UM-Dearborn professor emerita, poet, essayist, educator and human rights activist, and Malik Yakini, co-founder and Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network (DBCFSN).
    Here are bios for the speakers:
    • Gloria House is a poet, essayist, educator and human rights activist with a deep connection to the city of Detroit. In 2019, Dr. House was named the Kresge Foundation Eminent Artist. Dr. House designed the African American and African Studies (AAAS) major program at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, and served as Director of the AAAS Program before her retirement in 2014. Dr. House is the editor of the Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award Series of Broadside Lotus Press, co-editor of the Detroit periodical Riverwise and lead editor of the anthology, A Different Image: The Legacy of Broadside Press (2004) – which received the Notable Book of Michigan Award from the Library of Michigan in 2005. In addition, She is currently an organizer in the Detroit Independent Freedom Schools Movement, the Black Legacy Coalition, and the Coalition for Police Transparency and Accountability.
    • Malik Yakini is an educator, farmer and food justice advocate. He is the co-founder and Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network (DBCFSN), and a co-founder of the National Black Food and Justice Alliance. DBCFSN operates a seven-acre urban farm and has led the launch of the Detroit People’s Food Co-op, a cooperative grocery store in Detroit’s North End. Yakini was also the Executive Director of Nsoroma Institute Public School Academy, a K-8 African-centered school, for 20 years. Co-sponsored by the University of Michigan’s Office of Academic Multicultural Initiatives (OAMI) under the Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (ODEI), and the Ross School of Business with support from the William K. McInally Memorial Lecture Fund. 

    UM-FLINT KEYNOTE: LEARNING FROM THE PAST AND MOVING FORWARD TOGETHER
    3-4:30 p.m., Online, RSVP and attend the event.
    Join UM-Flint for a keynote from Sheldon Neeley, who has served on the Flint Civil Service Commission, Flint City Council, in the Michigan State House of Representatives, and currently serves as the Flint Mayor.  Following his remarks, we'll discuss the life and legacy of Dr. King with a panel moderated by Mia McNeil, Director of Government and Community Relations and including Dr. Kent Key from Michigan State University and Alona Tucker, president of UM-Flint's Black Student Union.

Tuesday, January 19

SHIFTING THE CULTURE OF ANTI-RACISM ORGANIZING
3:30-5 p.m., Online. Learn more and RSVP.
Social justice organizer Tawana Petty leads a discussion on how we can confront and work to dismantle historic racism and anti-Blackness in our society without creating undue emotional labor of those who are most affected; she also will discuss how non-Black people can practice genuine collaboration with the movement for Black Lives. Sponsored by UM-Dearborn's Center for Social Justice and Inclusion.

 

Wednesday, January 20

COMMUNITY ENGAGED RESEARCH REFLECTIONS ON MLK'S LEGACY
2-3 p.m., Online. Attend the event.
U-M Diversity Scholar Breanca Merritt is the founding director of the Center for Research on Inclusion and Social Policy (CRISP) and clinical assistant professor in the O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.In this role, she and her team produce and disseminate research to lay audiences about complex social issues and inequitable outcomes through policy briefs and multidisciplinary research experiences for students with community organizations. Her applied, community-engaged research analyzes local trends and evaluates programs related to social service provision, equitable access and experiences, and systemic sources of poverty. Her academic work assesses how legislation and organizational practices contribute to disparate outcomes, especially for racial/ethnic minorities. Topics addressed by these projects include housing and homelessness, family financial stability, and criminal justice, among others. Merritt wants to inform both local stakeholders and academic audiences.

Thursday, January 21

BUILDING THE BELOVED COMMUNITY THROUGH TRAUMA-INFORMED DESIGN
6-8 p.m., Online. Please RSVP.
According to Dr. King, “the Beloved Community is a global vision, in which all people can share in the wealth of the earth.” This symposium will explore community over chaos, the intersections of the twin pillars of economic and social justice, and the resources and education necessary to create the Beloved Community. We aim to interrogate the questions: What are the attitudes and systems that are keeping architects and urban planning from fostering the Beloved Community? What role does trauma-informed design play in educating the future leaders of the Beloved Community? What does trauma-informed design look like in urban planning and architecture education? Sponsored by U-M's Taubman College.

Friday, January 22

CANCEL CULTURE AND EXILE: BUILDING AN INCLUSIVE COMMUNITY?
12:30-2 p.m., Online. Go to the event.
What is the goal of Cancel Culture? Is it useful or destructive to activism and online culture? What has been your experience with Cancel Culture? We will be holding a facilitated dialogue to explore these questions through the lens of conflict and restorative justice. Sponsored by U-M Office of Student Conflict Resolution.

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