“Cyberbullying during COVID-19 Pandemic: Relation to Perceived Social Isolation”

December 1, 2021

Nadya Petri, a graduate student in the Master of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice program, presented preliminary findings from her Master's Thesis.

Nadya Petri, a graduate student in the Master of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice program, presented preliminary findings from her Master's Thesis at this year's American Society of Criminology meeting in Chicago.

Her project is titled: “Cyberbullying during COVID-19 Pandemic: Relation to Perceived Social Isolation.”

Short description of her work: "Drawing upon survey responses from 331 current college and university students, the master’s thesis explores the relationship between cyberbullying experiences, perceived social isolation, and social media usage during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specifically, it tests the hypothesis that increased perceived social isolation and interaction in cyberspace have increased the prevalence of cyberbullying among young adults."

According to Dr. Donald Shelton, director of the Criminology and Criminal Justice program, "Nadya is one of our premier graduate students. Her thesis is an outstanding capstone of her work and the CCJ graduate program."

Assistant Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice Maya Barak adds, "Nadya is a rising star. I am confident that this is only the beginning and that in the not-so-distant future it is who will be citing her work!"

Congratulations to Nadya on her very impressive presentation!

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