Getting your Hands Dirty

2/26/2019

During Summer 2019, a four-week archeology field school is being offered to explore environmental change, community, and religion in Cape Cod, Massachusetts in the 17th Century.

John Chenoweth, associate professor of anthropology, likes historical sites and museums because of the things that can be learned about human beings and cultures.

“Archaeology allows us to address things that are bigger than us and help us relate to time and space,” said Chenoweth. 

He is a historical archaeologist and anthropologist and most of his work highlights the Caribbean, (the British Virgin Islands) and the interaction of religion and slavery. Recently, Chenoweth’s work has focused on the members of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). 

 

Getting Your Hands Dirty 

Chenoweth wants students to know that fieldwork is educational, and Field School Scholarships are offered. 

“This scholarship sends students to an anthropological field school,” he said. “And in most cases, these are archaeology schools and students get to decide where they want to go. Some have gone to Malta, France, or Madagascar.”

For Summer 2019, a four-week archaeology field school is being offered to explore environmental change, community, and religion in Cape Cod, Massachusetts in the 17th Century.  

On Friday’s in the Fall semester, students can participate in an archaeology field school in southeast Michigan. The work at the site includes mapping, conservation, archival research, soil surveys and more. 

To complement the work done in the field, CASL houses an archaeology lab for teaching sessions, and archaeological collections. The class ANTH 201: Introduction to Archaeology is typically offered during the winter term.

Be sure to visit the Archaeology@Dearborn page to learn more information. 

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