Khalid el-Hakim presents in CEHHS on authentic teaching with artifacts

9/26/2017

The founder of the Black History 101 Mobile Museum, gave a riveting, multi-media presentation on teaching African American history with primary sources.

Khalid el-Hakim teaching on African American history
Khalid el-Hakim teaching on African American history
Khalid el-Hakim listens to Gay Johnson commenting on the chains used to restrict the movement of slaves.

DEARBORN, MI. - Khalid el-Hakim, founder of the Black History 101 Mobile Museum, gave a riveting, multi-media presentation on "Authentic Teaching with Primary Sources" on Saturday, September 23, 2017 in the College of Education, Health, and Human Services (CEHHS).  Students, staff, faculty, and members of the community analyzed authentic artifacts, and they engaged in discussions of race, prejudice, and teaching with evidence.

In 1995, el-Hakim established the Black History 101 Mobile Museum in order to provide access to quality exhibits celebrating African American history.  Since then, he has brought the museum to over 300 institutions in 28 states, including K-12 schools, universities, houses of worship, libraries and museums.  Over 10,000 school children have learned about African American history from el-Hakim and his rich collection of more than 7,000 artifacts.

Currently earning his PhD degree in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Illinois, el-Hakim skillfully used Philip Yenawine’s Visual Thinking Strategies to stimulate discussions.  el-Hakim also posed and fielded questions about history, culturally responsive teaching, and museum work.

Participants sharing their interpretations of historic objects

Julia Richie points to evidence in el-Hakim's collection

“With all the frustration surrounding the education system and its limited capacity to teach young people about minority cultures and history, I'm encouraged by the efforts of educators working through informal channels like storytelling, hip hop, activism, or in el-Hakim's case, a mobile museum. Political by nature, formal education tends to promote a narrow cultural perspective, but el-Hakim reminds us that the power to deepen the perspectives of our communities is exclusive to no one. As racial tensions escalate around the country, these kinds of undertakings are indispensable," commented Casey MacLean, a preservice teacher in secondary social studies education.

Participants discussing historic artifacts

Audience members candidly share their interpretations and views of historic objects

el-Hakim will return to UM-Dearborn on March 7, 2018, with the Black History 101 Mobile Museum, for a special exhibition of artifacts from 1968.  On March 8th, he will present at the Douglass Academy for Young Men in Detroit.

Sponsors of the lecture by Khalid el-Hakim included the Office of Student Engagement, the Office of Metropolitan Impact, the Hub for Teaching and Learning, and the Dean’s Office in the College of Education, Health, and Human Services.  CEHHS would like to thank Dr. Julie Anne Taylor for planning the event.

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