Campus, Counseling, and Self-Help Resources

General Campus Resources

Talent Gateway Resource Guide

Self-Help Self Evaluation 

ULifeline UM-Dearborn

Self-Help Phone Apps

The Worry Box

Breathe Relax

Stop Breathe & Think

Stop Panic & Anxiety Self-Help

Best Social Phobia

Depression CBT Self Help Guide

Meditation Timer

Virtual Hope Box

SuperBetter

Calm

Calm Harm

Tide

Wysa

Brain Waves

Aura

Headspace

Replika

Habit Tracker

Gratitude 365

MoodKit

Trello

Managing Your Distress After a Traumatic Event

American Psychological Association: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/mass-shooting.aspx  

CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/masstrauma/factsheets/public/coping.pdf

National Child Traumatic Stress Network: http://www.nctsn.org/trauma-types/terrorism

APA on resilience: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience.aspx

Gatherings being organized: http://www.weareorlando.org/

Relaxation Exercises

Here at CAPS, like other counseling centers we offer audio recordings of relaxation exercises on our web site.  The following two exercises are freely available for use by anyone interested. 

You can listen to either exercise directly from this Web site, or you can download the exercises onto your computer. The recordings of these exercises are not copyrighted—they can be used or copied or recorded to a CD freely.

To download the exercises as MP3 files, click here for the Progressive Relaxation Exercise (8MB), or here for the Combination Relaxation Exercise (12MB). To save the file onto your computer right click on the links and select save target as.

Steps for using the relaxation exercises

1. Try to practice whichever exercise you prefer at least once or twice a day. Expect your ability to relax to improve as you continue practicing, and expect to practice two or three weeks before you become genuinely proficient. Once you learn how to do one of the exercises, you may no longer require the recorded instructions, and you can tailor the exercise to your own liking.

2. Avoid practicing within an hour before or after a meal (either hunger or feeling full may distract you). Also avoid practicing immediately after engaging in vigorous exercise.

3. Sit quietly and in a comfortable position, with your legs uncrossed and your arms resting at your sides. This is especially important when you are first learning the exercise.

4. Adopt a calm, accepting attitude towards your practice. Don't worry about how well you're doing or about possible interruptions. Instead, know that with repetition your ability to relax will grow.

5. When you are ready, close your eyes, begin listening to the recording, and follow the directions. As you complete the exercise, you can expect your mind to wander a bit—when this happens you can simply re-direct your focus back to the recording.

6. Once you've finished, stretch, look around and remain still another minute or two.

7. As you become skilled with either of the exercises, try applying them to specific situations that might otherwise be anxiety provoking, such as tests, oral presentations, difficult social situations, job interviews, insomnia, and so forth. If you need help learning or applying the exercises, consider meeting with a counselor.

Domestic & Sexual Abuse

Does your partner put you down and make you feel ashamed?

Does your partner tell you what to do and who you can see?

Has your partner ever threatened to hurt you, your family or your pet?

Has your partner ever pushed or hit you or forced you to have sex?

If you answered "yes" even once, your partner is abusive.

You are not alone. Help is available:

National Domestic Violence Hotline:
800-799-SAFE (7233) or 800-787-3224 (TTY)

National Sexual Assault Hotline:
800-656-HOPE (4673)

Wayne County

First Step: 
734-722-6800 
888-453-5900

ACCESS
313-216-2204

Oakland County

Haven: 
248-334-1274

Women's Survival Center: 
248-335-2685

Macomb County

Turning Point
586-463-4430

Grief 

Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief will be. Grieving is a personal and highly individual experience. How you grieve depends on many factors, including your personality and coping style, your life experience, your faith, and the nature of the loss. The grieving process takes time. Healing happens gradually; it can’t be forced or hurried—and there is no “normal” timetable for grieving. Some people start to feel better in weeks or months. For others, the grieving process is measured in years. Whatever your grief experience, it’s important to be patient with yourself and allow the process to naturally unfold.

Stages of Grief

Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.”

Anger: Why is this happening? Who is to blame?”

Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.”

Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.”

Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.”

If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who grieves goes through all of these stages—and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. In fact, some people resolve their grief without going through any of these stages. And if you do go through these stages of grief, you probably won’t experience them in a neat, sequential order, so don’t worry about what you “should” be feeling or which stage you’re supposed to be in.

Common Signs and Symptoms of Grief

Shock and disbelief – Right after a loss, it can be hard to accept what happened. You may feel numb, have trouble believing that the loss really happened, or even deny the truth. If someone you love has died, you may keep expecting him or her to show up, even though you know he or she is gone.

Sadness – Profound sadness is probably the most universally experienced symptom of grief. You may have feelings of emptiness, despair, yearning, or deep loneliness. You may also cry a lot or feel emotionally unstable.

Guilt – You may regret or feel guilty about things you did or didn’t say or do. You may also feel guilty about certain feelings (e.g. feeling relieved when the person died after a long, difficult illness). After a death, you may even feel guilty for not doing something to prevent the death, even if there was nothing more you could have done.

Anger – Even if the loss was nobody’s fault, you may feel angry and resentful. If you lost a loved one, you may be angry with yourself, God, the doctors, or even the person who died for abandoning you. You may feel the need to blame someone for the injustice that was done to you.

Fear – A significant loss can trigger a host of worries and fears. You may feel anxious, helpless, or insecure. You may even have panic attacks. The death of a loved one can trigger fears about your own mortality, of facing life without that person, or the responsibilities you now face alone.

Physical symptoms – We often think of grief as a strictly emotional process, but grief often involves physical problems, including fatigue, nausea, lowered immunity, weight loss or weight gain, aches and pains, and insomnia.

Importance of Taking Care of Yourself

When you’re grieving, it’s more important than ever to take care of yourself. The stress of a major loss can quickly deplete your energy and emotional reserves. Looking after your physical and emotional needs will help you get through this difficult time.

Face your feelings. You can try to suppress your grief, but you can’t avoid it forever. In order to heal, you have to acknowledge the pain. Trying to avoid feelings of sadness and loss only prolongs the grieving process. Unresolved grief can also lead to complications such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and health problems.

Express your feelings in a tangible or creative way. Write about your loss in a journal. If you’ve lost a loved one, write a letter saying the things you never got to say; make a scrapbook or photo album celebrating the person’s life; or get involved in a cause or organization that was important to him or her.

Look after your physical health. The mind and body are connected. When you feel good physically, you’ll also feel better emotionally. Combat stress and fatigue by getting enough sleep, eating right, and exercising. Don’t use alcohol or drugs to numb the pain of grief or lift your mood artificially.

Don’t let anyone tell you how to feel, and don’t tell yourself how to feel either. Your grief is your own, and no one else can tell you when it’s time to “move on” or “get over it.” Let yourself feel whatever you feel without embarrassment or judgment. It’s okay to be angry, to yell at the heavens, to cry or not to cry. It’s also okay to laugh, to find moments of joy, and to let go when you’re ready.

Plan ahead for grief “triggers.” Anniversaries, holidays, and milestones can reawaken memories and feelings. Be prepared for an emotional wallop, and know that it’s completely normal. If you’re sharing a holiday or lifecycle event with other relatives, talk to them ahead of time about their expectations and agree on strategies to honor the person you loved.

Counseling and Psychological Services

2157 -
University Center (UC)
Phone: 
313-593-5430
Fax: 
313-593-3263
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