About the Program

This certificate program provides fundamental principles of vehicle electrification, with emphasis on application of these principles to emerging automotive technologies. It covers such topics as automotive powertrain, vehicle electronics, battery technology, electric and hybrid drives. (12 credit hours)

The certificate can be completed entirely on campus, entirely online, or through a combination of on-campus and online courses.    

Course Descriptions

Please choose four courses to complete the required 12 credit hours.

 

AENG/ME 547 Automotive Powertrains I

Topics in vehicle powertrain kinematics and dynamics, engine output characteristics, vehicle road load analysis, engine-transmission matching, design and analysis of gears and gear systems, planetary gear trains, design of powertrain components, clutch design and analysis, transmission design and analysis, torque and ratio analysis of automatic transmissions. (3 credits)Topics in vehicle powertrain kinematics and dynamics, engine output characteristics, vehicle road load analysis, engine-transmission matching, design and analysis of gears and gear systems, planetary gear trains, design of powertrain components, clutch design and analysis, transmission design and analysis, torque and ratio analysis of automatic transmissions. (3 credits)

ME 548 Automotive Powertrains II

Simulation of vehicle performance; dynamics in gear shifting; engine balance, fuel economy, and performance related to powertrains; powertrain arrangements, manual and automatic transmissions, automotive axles, four-wheel-drive systems; design and manufacturing of gearing systems. (3 credits)

ME 570 Powertrain NVH of Elect Veh

This course focuses on the Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH) characteristics of Electric Vehicles (EV), Hybrid Electrical Vehicles (HEV), and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PHEV). Topics include principles of mechanical vibration and acoustics, driveline induced noise/vibration from both conventional internal combustion engine and electrical motor/generator, cooling fan noise, regenerative braking system and electrical accessory noise. The potential countermeasures for typical noise/vibration sources will be presented. The course consists of classroom lectures and experimental laboratory sessions. The laboratory sessions will provide the student with hands-on experience on noise/vibration measurements and analyses. The student will be required to carry out a course project on NVH related subject of electrified vehicles. (3 credits)

ME 576 Battery Sys Modeling & Ctrl

Full Course Title: Battery Systems, Modeling, and Control This course will cover modeling, control, and estimation techniques for battery systems. Students will learn how electrochemical systems work and how they can be mathematically described. A simple phenomenological electrical circuit model and a detailed physics-based model that can capture diffusion dynamics will be covered. The thermal behavior of a battery system and its modeling will be covered as well. Students will learn the basic functions of battery management systems for monitoring state-of-charge, state-of-power, and state-of-health in applications to automotive and consumer electronics. (3 credits)

ECE 510 Vehicle Electronics I

This course discusses the principles of electrical engineering and applications of electrical and electronic systems in automobiles, including resistive, inductive, and capacitive circuit analysis, semiconductor diodes, junction transistors, FETS, rectifiers, and power supplies, small signal amplifiers, biasing considerations, gain-bandwidth limitations, circuit models. Some automotive EE applications are used for case study. Three lecture hours per week. (Not open to students with EE degree.) (3 credits)

ECE 515 Vehicle Electronics II

This course discusses advanced topics in electronics with an emphasis on vehicle applications. It will include ignition systems and controls, amplifiers, frequency characteristics of electronic circuits, feedback in electronic systems and stability, power electronics and motor drive controls (DC/DC and DC/AC converters) and EMC issues. Selected examples include applications such as voltage regulators and battery chargers. Three lecture hours per week. (3 credits)

ECE 530 Energy Storage Systems

This course introduces the basics of energy storage systems for EDV. It will cover battery basics, ultracapacitors, flywheels, and hybrid energy storage concepts. Battery management, battery charging, and battery safety will be covered. Finally, the requirements of EDV and renewable energy application examples will be explained. Lead acid, nickel metal hydride, and lithium ion batteries will be covered. Other energy storage systems such as super conducting magnetic, hydraulic, compressed air, and integrated (hybrid) energy storage systems, will be discussed as well. (3 credits)

ECE 5462 Elec Aspects of Hybrid Vehicle

To introduce fundamental concepts and the electrical aspects of HEV, including the design, control, modeling, battery and other energy storage devices, and electric propulsion systems. It covers vehicle dynamics, energy sources, electric propulsion systems, regenerative braking, parallel and series HEV design, practical design considerations, and specifications of hybrid vehicles. Three lecture hours per week. (3 credits)

ECE 646 Adv Elec Drive Transportation

This course gives in depth study in advanced technologies in the electrified vehicle powertrain. The course will cover topics such as hybrid powertrain architectures, dynamics of hybrid transmissions, battery management systems, battery control electronics, PHEV and HEV power management, survivability of military hybrid vehicles, packaging of PHEV electric drive components, optimization of PHEV components, optimization of electric drive efficiency through power management, vehicle to grid technology, emerging technology in electric drive transportation. Three hours per week. (3 credits)

Learning Goals and Outcomes

Learning Goals and Outcomes

  1. Students will have understanding of the fundamental principles of electric vehicles and related areas. 
  2. Students will learn advanced and emerging topics regarding electric vehicles and related areas.
  3. Program completion will contribute to participating students’ professional advancement.

 

Admission Requirements

Applicants must possess an undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering or a related field with an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher. Students from other engineering backgrounds will be considered on a case by case basis.

https://umdearborn.edu/admissions/graduate/how-apply/graduate-non-degree-application-procedures

Tentative Course Schedule

AENG/ME 547 Fall

ME 548 Winter

ME 570 Fall

ME 576 Winter

ECE 510 Fall, Winter

ECE 515 Winter

ECE 530 Winter

ECE 5462 Fall

ECE 646 Winter

CECS Graduate Education Office

2060/2070
Professional Education Center [PEC]
Phone: 
313-593-0897
Fax: 
313-593-9967
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