About the Program

The automotive industry of the twenty-first century is advancing at a rapid pace with great emphasis on lightweight structures, alternative energy sources, high efficiency powertrains, intelligent control systems, lower emissions, robust design and manufacturing, as well as improved comfort and safety. To meet the challenges of the automotive industry, engineers are required to improve their technical knowledge and skills in a variety of topics that are beyond the realm of traditional engineering curricula. 

Today's automotive engineers are expected to make connections among different areas of knowledge and integrate them in ways that benefit the automotive industry, society and the environment. Automotive engineers must be well grounded in their own areas of specialty. They must also have a good understanding of the related disciplines, be skilled in synthesis, analysis and design, work effectively in a team environment, and adopt a 'systems' approach. 

In response to these needs, the College of Engineering and Computer Science offers a 30-credit-hour interdisciplinary graduate degree program leading to a master's degree in Automotive Systems Engineering. Many courses in this program are specifically designed to address the new and emerging technology in the automotive industry. Students in this program will not only learn about advanced technologies, but also how to apply them in practice for creative design and problem solving. 

Get an Inside Look

MSE in Automotive Systems Engineering
Most of the tier one supplier companies are around here and the vast majority of our students come from these companies. We have experts in vehicle dynamics, powertrains, and ergonomics.
Professor PK Mallick

Program Details

The program provides, depth in the area of automotive engineering, breadth across engineering disciplines of electrical, industrial, mechanical, manufacturing and materials engineering, and an opportunity to gain industrially relevant engineering design or research experience through a capstone project or a master's thesis.

Almost all classes are held Monday-Thursday, 6-9 PM. Classes are available in Fall (Sept-Dec), Winter (Jan-Apr), Summer I (May-June) and Summer II (July-Aug) terms. The Fall and Winter courses are held once a week and the Summer I and Summer II courses are held twice a week. 

  • Program Goals

    MSE-ASE Program Goals

    1. Ability to apply engineering knowledge and skills to engineering problems.
    2. Ability to design, analyze, and model automotive, manufacturing, and energy system or process
    3. Ability to communicate effectively in professional reporting and presentations

    MSE-ASE Learning Outcomes:

    1. Students will be able to apply knowledge and skills to engineering problems
    2. Students will be able to design, analyze, and model automotive systems or process
    3. Students will be able to communicate effectively in professional reporting and presentations.
  • Eligibility Requirements

    Admission Requirements:

    An applicant to the program should hold a Bachelor of Science (BS) or equivalent degree in engineering from an ABET-accredited program with a minimum cumulative grade point of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale). An applicant with a lower GPA may be considered for admission consistent with the Rackham guidelines.

    Please note: At least two (2) letters of recommendation are required as part of the application. These should come from people who know you as an engineer, either academically (professor or research advisor) or professionally (supervisor or manager). Letters of reference from peer employees or personal sources are invalid and will not be considered.

  • Online Options

    The Automotive Systems Engineering program is also offered online through the Distance Learning Network (DLN). The online courses utilize video streaming of the lectures given on campus. The online students have the opportunity to interact with the instructors and with fellow students (both on campus as well as online) through CANVAS. The class lectures, notes, and discussions are posted on CANVAS for online students' access. 

  • Graduation Requirements

    The candidate must complete at least 30 semester hours of graduate work approved by the program advisor/graduate advisory committee with a grade of at least a B covering all courses elected. These 30 hours must include two required core courses, two elective core courses and six other elective courses. Students cannot have more than one B- in the program and must maintain a B average to remain in good academic standing. A grade of B- in more than one course will not count for graduate credit. Any grade below B- is not acceptable.

Curriculum

  • Core Courses (12 credit hours)
    • Required Core Courses

      • AENG 500 The Automobile - An Integrated System 
      • AENG 587 Automotive Manufacturing Processes
    • Elective Core Courses (select any two from the following)

      • AENG 502   Automotive Systems Modeling
      • AENG 505   Intro to Embedded Systems
      • AENG 510   Vehicle Electronics I
      • AENG 545   Vehicle Ergonomics I
      • AENG 547   Automotive Powertrains I
      • AENG 581   Material Selection in Automotive Design
      • AENG 596   Internal Combustion Engines I
      • IMSE 515, 516 or 517    Fundamentals of Program Management / Project Management and Control /  Managing Global Programs
  • Elective Courses (18 credit hours)

    A student may select all six elective courses from one of the four concentration areas below. Students may also select any combination of six courses from any of the four concentration areas.

    Students may also elect to do a guided-study project of either 3 or 6 credit hours in lieu of one or two courses, or a master’s thesis of 6 credit hours in lieu of two courses. A 6 credit hour project or a 6 credit hour thesis will require work over two full semesters. The program director’s approval is required for a student to do a project or thesis.

    • Electrical and Computer Concentration

      • ECE 515        Vehicle Electronics II
      • ECE 530        Energy Storage Systems
      • ECE 531        Intelligent Vehicle Systems
      • ECE 532        Automotive Sensors and Actuators
      • ECE 533        Active Automotive Safety Systems
      • ECE 5462      Electric Aspects of Hybrid Vehicles
      • ECE 565        Digital Control Systems
      • ECE 580        Digital Signal Processing
      • ECE 646        Advanced Electric Drive in Transportation
    • Industrial and Manufacturing Concentration

      • IMSE 538       Intelligent Manufacturing Systems
      • IMSE 561       Total Quality Management
      • IMSE 567       Reliability Analysis
      • IMSE 577       User Interface Design and Analysis
      • IMSE 593       Vehicle Package Engineering
      • AENG 546      Vehicle Ergonomics II
      • AENG 589      Automotive Assembly Systems
      • ME 595          Digital Manufacturing
    • Mechanical Engineering Concentration

      • ME 537          Automotive Air Conditioning Systems
      • ME 543          Vehicle Dynamics
      • ME 545          Acoustics and Noise Control Systems
      • ME 548          Automotive Powertrains II
      • ME 558          Fracture and Fatigue Considerations in Design
      • ME 570          Powertrain NVH of Electric Vehicles
      • ME 597          Internal Combustion Engines II
      • ME 598          Automotive Emissions
      • AENG 550     Design of Automotive Chassis and Body Systems
      • AENG 551     Application of Finite Element Methods in Automotive Structure Design
      • AENG 555     Vehicle Stability and Control
      • AENG 566     Vehicle Thermal Management
      • AENG 598     Energy Systems for Automotive Vehicles
      • AENG 650     Analysis and Design for Vehicle Crashworthiness
    • Automotive Materials Concentration

      • AENG 584     Lightweight Automotive Alloys
      • AENG 586     Design and Manufacturing with Lightweight Automotive Materials
      • AENG 588     Design and Manufacturing for Environment
      • ME 582          Injection Molding
      • ME 583          Mechanical Behavior of Materials
      • ME 584          Mechanical Behavior of Polymers
      • ME 587          Automotive Composites
      • ME 589          Composite Materials
      • ME 591          Environmental Degradation of Materials
  • Capstone Projects

    A capstone is a design or case study of interest to the students. It may be done by an individual or a team. Topics may be chosen from any of the areas of automotive engineering. The student (or the team) will submit a project report and give an oral presentation at the end of the second term. The project spans two terms.

    Following are the guidelines and some examples of capstone projects. This may give you some ideas that you may want to consider for AE 698.  If you would like to work on a project, contact Ms. Sherry Boyd, sjboyd@umich.edu in the department office for assistance. 

  • Guidelines
    • Must complete six (6) courses before registering for Capstone Project (AE 698) or by consent of advisor.
    • May work in a team consisting of two or three members. Individual projects are also allowed.
    • Must submit a project proposal (maximum two pages long) to Ms. Sherry Boyd in the department office at least two weeks prior to the semester in which the project will be started.  The proposal should contain the following items:
      • Title  
      • Names and Contact Information (e-mail and phone no.) of Team Members  
      • Background  
      • Objectives  
      • Procedure/Methodology  
      • Timing Chart
    • The project proposal must be approved by the faculty member in charge (project advisor).
    • The team will work closely with the project advisor.  The team members will be expected to meet regularly with the project advisor, updating him/her on the progress of the project and seeking further direction.
    • The project can be in any area of automotive engineering or related fields but must be big enough in scope for a two-semester, six credit hour course for each team member.
    • A rough estimate for the amount of work involved is nine hours per week per team member for two semesters.
    • The project must produce a high quality work to be judged by a project committee, which will include the faculty member in charge and at least one other committee member, one of which may be an industrial advisor. 
    • The team will be expected to give a written progress report to the project advisor at the end of the first term.
    • Each team must submit a bound copy of the project and make an open oral presentation at the end of the project.  For the format of the Project Report, send an e-mail to sjboyd@umich.edu.
    • The faculty member in charge will give the letter grade at the end of the project in consultation with the other committee member(s).
  • Titles of Recently Completed Capstone Projects and Thesis
    • Comparative Study between IC and Non-traditional Powertrains with respect to Various Vehicle Attributes (Capstone Project)
    • Design of Next Generation Fuel Pump Module for Harley Davidson Motor Cycles (Capstone Project)
    • Value Analysis Tool for Automotive Interior Door Trim Panel Material Selection (Capstone Project)
    • Low Slope Injector Calibration and Fuel Density Effects including E85 (Capstone Project)
    • Applying Six Sigma and Total Quality Management Tools to Tie Rod Joint Torque Efforts (Capstone Project)
    • Modeling of Plug-In Series Hybrid Powertrain for USPS Carrier Route Vehicle (Capstone Project)
    • Trailbraking: Increasing Vehicle Responsiveness by Braking (Capstone Project)
    • Design Improvement for Shift Quality in Automotive Manual Transmissions. Shift Effort and Feel Analytical Model (Capstone Project
    • Design of Dual Sliding Mechanism and Performance Analysis of Low Mass Vehicle Doors (Capstone Project)
    • Brake System Model Correlation Study (Capstone Project)
    • Weight Optimization of an Automatic Transmission (Capstone Project)
    • Modeling of a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Powertrain Test Cell using Bond Graphs (Thesis)
    • Effects of Crush Initiators on the Crush Behavior and Energy Absorption of Aluminum, Composite and Hybrid Round Tubes (Thesis)
    • Aqueous Corrosion Rate Determination of Magnesium Alloys using Various Techniques (Thesis)
    • Non-Linear Predictive Controllers for Vehicle Dynamics Enhancement (Thesis)
    • Investigating the Effects of Suspension Properties on Vehicle Roll Stability (Thesis)
    • Development of Accurate Constitutive Models for Simulation of Superplastic Forming (Thesis)
    • Comparative Study between IC and Non-traditional Powertrains with respect to Various Vehicle Attributes (Capstone Project)
    • Design of Next Generation Fuel Pump Module for Harley Davidson Motor Cycles (Capstone Project)
    • Value Analysis Tool for Automotive Interior Door Trim Panel Material Selection (Capstone Project)
    • Low Slope Injector Calibration and Fuel Density Effects including E85 (Capstone Project)
    • Applying Six Sigma and Total Quality Management Tools to Tie Rod Joint Torque Efforts (Capstone Project)
    • Modeling of Plug-In Series Hybrid Powertrain for USPS Carrier Route Vehicle (Capstone Project)
    • Trailbraking: Increasing Vehicle Responsiveness by Braking (Capstone Project)
    • Design Improvement for Shift Quality in Automotive Manual Transmissions. Shift Effort and Feel Analytical Model (Capstone Project
    • Design of Dual Sliding Mechanism and Performance Analysis of Low Mass Vehicle Doors (Capstone Project)
    • Brake System Model Correlation Study (Capstone Project)
    • Weight Optimization of an Automatic Transmission (Capstone Project)
    • Modeling of a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Powertrain Test Cell using Bond Graphs (Thesis)
    • Effects of Crush Initiators on the Crush Behavior and Energy Absorption of Aluminum, Composite and Hybrid Round Tubes (Thesis)
    • Aqueous Corrosion Rate Determination of Magnesium Alloys using Various Techniques (Thesis)
    • Non-Linear Predictive Controllers for Vehicle Dynamics Enhancement (Thesis)
    • Investigating the Effects of Suspension Properties on Vehicle Roll Stability (Thesis)

Sherry Boyd

2200
Heinz Prechter Engineering Complex (HPEC)
Phone: 
313-593-5582
Fax: 
313-593-5386
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